Liquid-vapor interface locations in a spheroidal container under low gravity
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Liquid-vapor interface locations in a spheroidal container under low gravity

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center in [Cleveland, Ohio .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Vapor-liquid equilibrium.,
  • Reduced gravity environments.,
  • Liquid-vapor interfaces.,
  • Microgravity.,
  • Oblate spheroids.,
  • Tanks (containers),
  • Weightlessness.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Microfiche. [Washington, D.C. : National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1986]. 1 microfiche.

StatementMichael J. Carney.
SeriesNASA technical memorandum -- 87145.
ContributionsLewis Research Center.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18289880M

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Liquid-vapor interface locations in a spheroidal container under low gravity. By M. J. Carney. Abstract. As a part of the general study of liquid behavior in low gravity environments, an experimental investigation was conducted to determine if there are equilibrium liquid-vapor interface configurations that can exist at more than one location Author: M. J. Carney. Determining liquid-vapor interface configuration in oblate spheroids in low-gravity environments. Low gravity Liquid vapor Interface Configurations in Spheroidal Containers Jack A. . Liquid-Vapor Interface Potential for Water F. H. SULLINGER, JR., AND A. BEN-NAIM Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, Murray Hill, New Jersey (Received 19 July ) The. water molecule ha~ been idealize~ as a point dipole plus point quadrupole, encased in a spherical . The first term on the right is the work required to create a surface of vapor–liquid interface around the drop. The factor σ vl is the work required to create a unit area of the interface. It is called the surface energy or surface second term on the right of () is the energy change associated with the vapor molecules going into the liquid phase.

Liquid-vapor interface locations in a spheroidal container under low gravity. are equilibrium liquid-vapor interface configurations that can exist at more than one location in oblate. Liquid-Vapor Interface of a Lennard-Jones System Abstract: A three dimensional molecular dynamics simulation was performed for a simple Lennard-Jones system to study a liquid-vapor interface. A clear separation can be seen between the two phases and with the density of the liquid and gas being approximately 5 and , respectively, in reduced. Under this condition, liquid-vapor interfaces are formed at the entrances of each pore. Therefore, since a vapor pressure difference is maintained by a temperature difference between both sides of the membrane pores, molecules evaporate from the feed liquid/vapor interface, cross the pores in vapor phase and condense on the liquid/vapor. Adsorption of Vapor at a Liquid-Vapor Interface In a previous paper the author has shown that the surface tension of a liquid may be expressed by the equation cr = oi — cr2 (i) where a is the surface tension measured.

Abstract. In the previous chapters we studied the bulk properties of fluids. Now we shall discuss the interface properties of a two-phase system consisting of a liquid and its saturated vapor at temperature two-phase equilibrium is characterized by equality of temperature, pressure, and chemical potentials in both bulk phases (see Chap. 6). Physically correct boundary conditions on vapor-liquid interfaces are essential in order to make an analysis of flows of a liquid including bubbles or of a gas including droplets. Suitable boundary conditions do not exist at the present time. This book is concerned with the kinetic boundary. Low-gravity drop-tower experiments are carried out for an exotic'' rotationally-symmetric container, which admits an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium symmetric capillary free surfaces. Satterlee and Reynolds [8] have successfully solved the free sloshing problepi in cylindrical containers under low gravity and formulated a variational principle for this purpose. Yeh [9], using a similar approach, solved the free and forced sloshing problem under low-gravity conditions, without force and moment or an equivalent mechanical model.